University’s medieval projects

My research (and I will start posting a series of research diaries soon) in part concerns representations of death and the afterlife, with a particular focus on how fears about and ideas of the end of the world influenced the writing of history. I am preparing a paper and article of the vision of Dryhthelm, who Bede, the Anglo-Saxon historian writing in the eight century, tells us came back from the dead. The vision itself is quite rooted in apocryphal and early Christian images of heaven and hell.

But while I am focussing on the Anglo-Saxons, the university’s Department of Early and Medieval Irish is working on a major project examining Irish representations of the afterlife. De Finibus (On the ends) has been on the go for a few months and the website provides an introduction to the project, the people involved and, in time, a bibliography of relevant secondary literature. The team is working on editions of key Irish eschatological texts, and also aim to produce a sourcebook of the main literature.

Over at Christ on the Cross, meanwhile, members of UCC’s English and Art History departments are hard at work evaluating Irish representations of the crucifixion, both literary and material. It’s just a small bit outside my own research era (the project is focussed on AD800-1200 and I’m meandering through the 700s and earlier) but is still of huge relevance. The project’s mission statement is here, and the upcoming conference on March 29-30 looks like it will be a very interesting one indeed.

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4 thoughts on “University’s medieval projects

  1. Are you looking into the Latin Life of Fursey? A new edition of it was done a couple years ago. I’ve been wanting to get a copy for a while but I haven’t yet. It is one of Bede’s sources.

  2. I hope to do some detailed comparisons of the Dryhthelm vision with that of Fursey/Fursa, showing how Bede selected his extracts and material for his own needs. However, I am having trouble tracking down an edition it: the recent translation was by Oliver Rackham, wasn’t it? Our university library seems to be without a copy; it may have a Latin edition but my language skills aren’t quite up to scratch just yet!

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